The 4 Freedoms Library

It takes a nation to protect the nation

The useful idiots of the left prove they learned nothing from the Iranian "revolution" in 1979.  If a mosque was attacked in Britain the communists would rise to the defence of islam.  When Britain is sufficiently islamic, there would be no-one left to rise to defend the communists when they get attacked.

The left are simply the continuous enablers of islamisation.  Communists who recite the shahadah do not even follow Marx.  

Who would have thought that the only westernised country in the Maghreb would end up becoming another Iran?


http://www.marxist.com/salafist-attack-pcot.htm

Salafist attack on Communist offices in Tunisia

We have just received news about a Salafist attack against the offices of the Workers' Communist Party of Tunisia (PCOT) in the Al Kabaria neighbourhood, South of Tunis. We ask our readers to send messages of support.

This is a translation of an account of the events published in Sameh_b's blog:

"A new office of the Workers' Communist Party of Tunisia PCOT in Al Kabaria,a Southern suburbs of Tunis, was to be inaugurated on May 19 .. everything was ready for the inauguration ceremony to be held in the area (the room had been reserved and even a local rap group contacted for the occasion)

[Yesterday, April 29] when the sign of the office was installed around 6pm a group of young "Salafi" (as they are called by the neighborhood residents) came around claiming that the sign that was installed was a provocation for "Muslims"!

PCOT activists who were there were able to convince them to continue their way to the mosque where they were going to pray, except that after the prayer they returned to the charge but with a horde of uncontrollable youth (12 to 13 years old). The Salafist who shouted "Allahu Akbar" ordered the youth to attack the office and especially to tear down the sign .. they were told that the communist militants and unbelievers and Satanists, and they are not welcome in their neighborhood. They have also asked them to break down the door and ransack the premises, and the indoctrinated minors carried out these orders  .. they even destroyed the only PC available to the office, the library and a wooden table and a desk ..

The Salafist militants then attacked the young Communists, in full sight of frightened neighborhood residents, some of which have attempted to intervene in vain ...

Activists went to complain to the nearest police station and the party leader even called the Interior Minister hoping it would follow up this story, since, recently, the Salafi attacks are increasing and seem to be well orchestrated.

The most striking testimonies according to neighbors and activists assaulted:

- A child who was among the crowd addressed one of the Communist militants by asking: "You really are a Shiite? (Chii)," the comrade then replied "No, I'm Communist (Chouyouii)" (the terms in Arabic for Communist and Shiites are very close and confusing) .. he asked him "Do you believe in God?" he then recited the Chahda to show he was a believer .. Then he smiled and said, "but it's good, it is!"

- The neighbors have asked the general coordinator to abandon the office ... they claim that the Salafists have promised to return and burn the whole building ... The owner has also called in and asked the comrades to leave the apartment as soon as possible .. all are convinced that these Salafists will not let go. It seems that they rule the roost in the neighborhood.

- The Salafists have continued to roam the area even late at night and watched us passing by in cars making threatening gestures. Among them a bearded guy wearing red shorts, huge body imposing and glancing in a threatening manner, seemed to be the leader of the band ..

- It should be recalled that communist militants attacked are very young, barely 18 years for some. One of them had to pass his baccalaureate sports tomorrow but he is now injured in his hand."

We ask readers of In Defence of Marxism, particularly those from Communist organisations, to send messages of support and solidarity with the PCOT comrades of Al Kabaria. These will go a long way in boosting their morale. An injury to one is an injury to all.

These attacks should be placed in the context of an growing campaign of violence against left wing and trade union activists. On April 9, the day of the martyrs of the revolution, demonstrators in Tunis were brutally attacked by both the police and armed civilian groups. The PCOT has accused ruling party Ennahda of being behind these attacks. There is growing concern that there will be further attacks and provocations against the May Day demonstrations tomorrow. We think that the only effective way to defend workers' organisations offices, demonstrations, elected officials, etc. is through mass political work, revolutionary activity amongst the working class and, whenever necessary, the setting up of self-defence organisations.

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If this had been a Marxist killed in Greece by Golden Dawn, the left across the west would be holding demonstrations. 

What's that I hear?  It's the sound of one hand clapping.

When the Left's mascots kill Leftists or other mascots, the Leftists keep silent.  Such people are sacrificial lambs.  When the Left can use it to accuse their enemy, suddenly you can't shut them up.


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/07/world/africa/chokri-belaid-tunisi...;

CAIRO — A leading Tunisian opposition politician who had fiercely criticized the Islamist-led government, accusing it of turning a blind eye to violence by religious hard-liners, was fatally shot outside his home in Tunis on Wednesday, officials said.

The politician, Chokri Belaid, a leading member of a leftist opposition alliance formed in October, was shot by an unknown gunman or gunmen just as he was leaving his house in Tunis, Tunisia’s capital, the state news agency TAP said. A colleague in Mr. Belaid’s opposition alliance told Reuters that he was killed with four bullets to the head and chest.

Tunisia’s president, Moncef Marzouki, cut short an overseas trip and was scheduled to return to the country. The prime minister, Hamadi Jebali, called the killing “a political assassination and the assassination of the Tunisian revolution,” according to Reuters.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the killing, which appeared to represent a dangerous new phase in Tunisia’s troubled transition to democracy. Since becoming the first Arab country to overthrow its leader after the start of the so-called Arab Spring uprisings in 2011, Tunisia has been torn between its legacy as a bastion for Arab secularism, and its new role, as a proving ground for the region’s emerging democracies in which Islamists play a leading role.

Since the revolution, that competition has led to episodes of escalating political violence, often perpetrated by hard-line Islamists known as Salafis — but rarely killings.

Mr. Belaid and others had accused Ennahda, the ruling Islamist party, of accommodating the Salafis, by refusing to prosecute them or crack down on the groups. In recent days, Mr. Belaid, a lawyer who had received numerous death threats including from hard-line imams, had accused Islamists of carrying out an attack on a meeting of his supporters on Saturday.

“At the end of our meeting, a group of Ennahda mercenaries and Salafists attacked our activists,” Mr. Belaid said.

In a statement on Wednesday, Ennahda denied any responsibility, calling the killing a “heinous crime” that targeted the “security and stability of Tunisia.”

As news of the assassination spread on Wednesday, thousands of people gathered in front of the interior ministry, a massive gray building that is still a hated symbol of Tunisia’s deposed authoritarian leader, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, to express anger at Tunisia’s new government. “The people want the fall of the regime,” a group chanted, reprising the uprising’s refrain.

“Resignation, resignation, the cabinet of treason!” others shouted.

There were reports of attacks on Ennahda offices in different parts of the country, including in Sidi Bouzid, the town where the Tunisian revolt began.

“To have an assassination at this time with a firearm at point-blank range is shocking,” said Amna Guellali, a researcher for Human Rights Watch based in Tunis.

“We’re in a climate of political violence now,” she added, saying that Human Rights Watch had documented numerous attacks against activists, journalists and political figures by Salafist and other groups. “Last month, there were various leaders targeted, various meetings of political parties disrupted and assaulted,” she said.

Ms. Guellali said that on Tuesday, Mr. Belaid had called for a national dialogue to confront political violence. “He said political violence was becoming more organized due to the laxity of the government,” she said. “This just adds to the tragedy.”

The fascists are really good at killing and silencing all who dissent.

This story about what happened in Iran was published a few days after the recent assassination in Tunisia.  Looks like some in the west are regaining the memories they have suppressed for the past 30 years.

http://4freedoms.ning.com/group/Iran/forum/topics/iran-srebrenica-m...

It is amazing the duplicity of the Muslim Brotherhood.  They say that they condemn anyone who calls for bloodshed or assassination.  They can do that, and then assert that people should follow the sunna, behave like Mohammed -- which means "assassinate your critics".


http://english.alarabiya.net/articles/2013/02/07/265027.html

Egypt protects liberals’ homes after death threat

Egyptian police deployed security at the homes of prominent liberal opponents of the government on Thursday after a hardline cleric called for their deaths and a secular politician was gunned down in Tunisia.

The killing on Wednesday of Chokri Belaid, an outspoken critic of Tunisia’s Islamist-led government, sent tremors through Egypt.

In both countries where “Arab Spring” uprisings swept away veteran authoritarian rulers, two years of political turmoil have exposed divisions between Islamists and their secular opponents.

On the same day, Egyptian liberal politician Mohamed el Baradei, former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, sounded the alarm over a hardline cleric’s call for his death.

The cleric, Mahmoud Shaaban, appeared on a religious television channel and said leaders of Egypt’s main opposition coalition would get a death sentence under sharia (Islamic law).

He specifically mentioned el Baradei, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, and former presidential candidate Hamdeen Sabahy.

President Mohamed Mursi, a member of the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood which has dominated democratic elections since mass protests ousted President Hosni Mubarak in 2011, condemned such comments as tantamount to “terrorism.”

But he renewed accusations that the liberal opposition was inciting unrest.

“It is strange that some (in Egypt) advocate political violence and incite it while others, who claim to speak in the name of religion, allow ‘killing’ on the basis of political differences, which is terrorism itself,” a statement from Mursi’s office said.

“The presidency affirms its complete rejection of hate speech that falsely uses religion, and of which religion is innocent, and calls on national forces, religious institutions and leading thinkers to stand in a united front to confront this unacceptable language of incitement.”

Other Islamists and leftists across the political spectrum condemned Shaaban’s statement, as did the Muslim Brotherhood.

“The Muslim Brotherhood condemns calls allowing bloodshed and inciting killing, whatever their source,” it said in a statement on its website, quoting spokesman Mahmoud Ghozlan.

Prime Minister Hisham Qandil said on his Facebook page the cabinet was looking into legal steps it could take against “all those who issue or spread edicts or fatwas inciting violence.”

Street violence

Mursi has struggled to restore security and mend the ailing economy in the Arab world’s most populous country since he was elected in June.

At least 59 people died in more than a week of street protests starting late last month over what demonstrators regarded as Mursi’s attempts to monopolize power, as well as a broader sense of political and economic malaise.

Activists have called for more demonstrations on Friday. Ahead of those protests, Egyptian police stationed forces in front of opposition politicians' homes, security sources said.

“We’ve asked the Central Security leadership to appoint a fixed guard in front of the homes of Mohamed el Baradei and Hamdeen Sabahy,” one security source said.

A witness said around 15 police and a security car had been deployed on the street where el Baradei lives. el Baradei’s press office said he did not request the protection.

While Islamists enjoy substantial popular support, many Egyptians have grown frustrated at what they view as attempts to hijack a revolution they started to topple a dictator and improve their quality of life.

I came across this comment, and thought, surely everyone has heard of salafism.

"After last week's assassination of a Tunisian opposition politician – and the quest to find those responsible – the spotlight turned on a little-known ultra-conservative Muslim movement. Salafism, a puritanical but traditionally peaceful branch of Islam, has become increasingly important in Middle Eastern and north African nations since the Arab spring lifted the ruthless suppression on such groups."

Where did I see this comment?  In an article in "Hello" magazine?  Was it in my local newspaper?

Nope.  In The Guardian.  Was it a comment by some 16 y.o. hoping to be able to write on his UCAS application form, that he's got an active interest in politics?

Nope. It was a comment made by Graham Snowdon, deputy editor of The Guardian Weekly.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2013/feb/12/inside-guardian-w...

Are the Left really so blind, that they are only just now stumbling out, blinking, into the light of day?

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Mission Overview

Most Western societies are based on Secular Democracy, which itself is based on the concept that the open marketplace of ideas leads to the optimum government. Whilst that model has been very successful, it has defects. The 4 Freedoms address 4 of the principal vulnerabilities, and gives corrections to them. 

At the moment, one of the main actors exploiting these defects, is Islam, so this site pays particular attention to that threat.

Islam, operating at the micro and macro levels, is unstoppable by individuals, hence: "It takes a nation to protect the nation". There is not enough time to fight all its attacks, nor to read them nor even to record them. So the members of 4F try to curate a representative subset of these events.

We need to capture this information before it is removed.  The site already contains sufficient information to cover most issues, but our members add further updates when possible.

We hope that free nations will wake up to stop the threat, and force the separation of (Islamic) Church and State. This will also allow moderate Muslims to escape from their totalitarian political system.

The 4 Freedoms

These 4 freedoms are designed to close 4 vulnerabilities in Secular Democracy, by making them SP or Self-Protecting (see Hobbes's first law of nature). But Democracy also requires - in addition to the standard divisions of Executive, Legislature & Judiciary - a fourth body, Protector of the Open Society (POS), to monitor all its vulnerabilities (see also Popper). 
1. SP Freedom of Speech
Any speech is allowed - except that advocating the end of these freedoms
2. SP Freedom of Election
Any party is allowed - except one advocating the end of these freedoms
3. SP Freedom from Voter Importation
Immigration is allowed - except where that changes the political demography (this is electoral fraud)
4. SP Freedom from Debt
The Central Bank is allowed to create debt - except where that debt burden can pass across a generation (25 years).

An additional Freedom from Religion is deducible if the law is applied equally to everyone:

  • Religious and cultural activities are exempt from legal oversight except where they intrude into the public sphere (Res Publica)"

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