The 4 Freedoms Library

It takes a nation to protect the nation

Sharia Law does not give equal rights to women. This principle of disrespect then percolates thru to the mindset of the host country, giving an attitude where women can be attacked with impunity. Checkout this article on acid attacks in Pakistan to see some of the consequences. (Warning - disturbing images).

http://blogs.tampabay.com/photo/2009/11/terrorism-thats-personal.html

WORLD IN A SNAP | Interesting images from around the world

Terrorism that's personal (12 images)




EDITOR'S NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT


Text by Jim Verhulst, Times' Perspective editor | Photos by Emilio Morenatti, Associated Press


We typically think of terrorism as a political act.


But sometimes it’s very personal. It wasn’t a government or a guerrilla insurgency that threw acid on this woman’s face in Pakistan. It was a young man whom she had rejected for marriage. As the United
States ponders what to do in Afghanistan — and for that matter, in
Pakistan — it is wise to understand both the political and the personal,
that the very ignorance and illiteracy and misogyny that create the
climate for these acid attacks can and does bleed over into the
political realm. Nicholas Kristof, the New York Times op-ed columnist
who traveled to Pakistan last year to write about acid attacks, put it
this way in an essay at the time: “I’ve been investigating such acid
attacks, which are commonly used to terrorize and subjugate women and
girls in a swath of Asia from Afghanistan through Cambodia (men are
almost never attacked with acid). Because women usually don’t matter in
this part of the world, their attackers are rarely prosecuted and acid
sales are usually not controlled. It’s a kind of terrorism that becomes
accepted as part of the background noise in the region. ...


“Bangladesh has imposed controls on acid sales to curb such attacks, but otherwise it is fairly easy in Asia to walk into a shop and buy sulfuric or hydrochloric acid suitable for destroying a human face. Acid
attacks and wife burnings are common in parts of Asia because the
victims are the most voiceless in these societies: They are poor and
female. The first step is simply for the world to take note, to give
voice to these women.”
Since 1994, a Pakistani activist who founded the Progressive Women’s Association to
help such women “has documented 7,800 cases of women who were
deliberately burned, scalded or subjected to acid attacks, just in the
Islamabad area. In only 2 percent of those cases was anyone convicted.”


The geopolitical question is already hard enough: Should the United States commit more troops to Afghanistan and for what specific purpose? As American policymakers mull the options, here is a frame of reference
that puts the tough choices in even starker relief: Are acid attacks a
sign of just how little the United States can do to solve intractable
problems there — therefore, we should pull out? Or having declared war
on terrorism, must the United States stay out of moral duty, to try to
protect women such as these — and the schoolgirls whom the Taliban in
Afghanistan sprayed with acid simply for going to class — who have
suffered a very personal terrorist attack? We offer links to smart
essays that come to differing conclusions.


• In August, Perspective published a New York Times Magazine piece that followed up the story of Afghan sisters Shamsia and Atifa Husseini, who were attacked with acid simply for attending school. If you wish to
refresh your memory, you may read the original
article.


• Two very smart, informed observers come to opposite conclusions on the proper U.S. course of action in Afghanistan:


1. In his “Think Tank” blog at NewYorker.com, Steve Coll argues why we can’t leave — “What If We Fail In Afghanistan?” Read the essay in full.


2. In an essay entitled “The War We Can’t Win” in Commonweal (also reprinted in the November issue of Harper’s), Andrew J. Bacevich makes the case that we are overstating the importance of Afghanistan to U.S.
interests. Bacevich is a professor of International Relations at Boston
University and the author, most recently, of The Limits of Power. A
retired Army lieutenant colonel, he served from 1969 to 1992, in Vietnam
and the first Persian Gulf War. He was a conservative critic of the
Iraq war. Several of his essays have run before in Perspective. Read
his essay in full.



• Read the original story about acid attacks by Nicholas Kristof.


AP080724052909


Irum Saeed, 30, poses for a photograph at her office at the Urdu University of Islamabad, Pakistan, Thursday, July 24, 2008. Irum was burned on her face, back and shoulders twelve years ago when a boy whom
she rejected for marriage threw acid on her in the middle of the street.
She has undergone plastic surgery 25 times to try to recover from her
scars.










AP080710038862


Shameem Akhter, 18, poses for a photograph at her home in Jhang, Pakistan, Wednesday, July 10, 2008. Shameem was raped by three boys who then threw acid on her three years ago. Shameem has undergone plastic
surgery 10 times to try to recover from her scars.


AP080710038870


Najaf Sultana, 16, poses for a photograph at her home in Lahore, Pakistan on Wednesday, July 9, 2008. At the age of five Najaf was burned by her father while she was sleeping, apparently because he didn't want
to have another girl in the family. As a result of the burning Najaf
became blind and after being abandoned by both her parents she now lives
with relatives. She has undergone plastic surgery around 15 times to
try to recover from her scars.


AP081027041086


Shehnaz Usman, 36, poses for a photograph in Lahore, Pakistan, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2008. Shehnaz was burned with acid by a relative due to a familial dispute five years ago. Shehnaz has undergone plastic
surgery 10 times to try to recover from her scars.


AP081027041094


Shahnaz Bibi, 35, poses for a photograph in Lahore, Pakistan, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2008. Ten years ago Shahnaz was burned with acid by a relative due to a familial dispute. She has never undergone plastic surgery.


AP081027041102


Kanwal Kayum, 26, adjusts her veil as she poses for a photograph in Lahore, Pakistan, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2008. Kanwal was burned with acid one year ago by a boy whom she rejected for marriage. She has never
undergone plastic surgery.


AP081027041110


Munira Asef, 23, poses for a photograph in Lahore, Pakistan, Sunday, Oct. 26, 2008. Munira was burned with acid five years ago by a boy whom she rejected for marriage. She has undergone plastic surgery 7 times to
try to recover from her scars.


AP081107038390


Bushra Shari, 39, adjusts her veil as she poses for a photograph in Lahore, Pakistan, Friday, July. 11, 2008. Bushra was burned with acid thrown by her husband five years ago because she was trying to divorce
him. She has undergone plastic surgery 25 times to try to recover from
her scars.


AP081220036339


Memuna Khan, 21, poses for a photograph in Karachi, Pakistan, Friday, Dec. 19, 2008. Menuna was burned by a group of boys who threw acid on her to settle a dispute between their family and Menuna's. She has
undergone plastic surgery 21 times to try to recover from her scars.


AP081225010644


Zainab Bibi, 17, adjusts her veil as she poses for a photograph in Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 24, 2008. Zainab was burned on her face with acid thrown by a boy whom she rejected for marriage five years
ago. She has undergone plastic surgery several times to try to recover
from her scars.


AP081225010651


Naila Farhat, 19, poses for a photograph in Islamabad, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 24, 2008. Naila was burned on her face with acid thrown by a boy whom she rejected for marriage five years ago. She has
undergone plastic surgery several times to try to recover from her
scars.


AP080709042230


Saira Liaqat, 26, poses for the camera as she holds a portrait of herself before being burned, at her home in Lahore, Pakistan, Wednesday, July 9, 2008. When she was fifteen, Saira was married to a relative who
would later attack her with acid after insistently demanding her to
live with him, although the families had agreed she wouldn't join him
until she finished school. Saira has undergone plastic surgery 9 times
to try to recover from her scars.



Tags: Law, Sharia, Why, WomenInIslam, hate, should, we

Views: 54

Replies to This Discussion

As friend said to me recently, women should be at the forefront of the struggle. why the vast majority are not is the subject of another discussion!
Also, why the hell aren`t the countries with major weapons, aren`t using them to wipe these barbaric pieces of trash off the planet, is more disturbing!!!! Would be nice to help the women, but considering what has been presented to our cultures, we have to think about self preservation first, no matter what!!! If we fail to take that attitude, then You can bet, it`ll be in your back yard!!!! War with these evil creatures is inevitable!!!!! We need to mail this Bitch obama, and his punk ass wife to one of those countries, to never be heard from again, and throw congress in for the trip as well!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Muslim Terrorism Count

Thousands of Deadly Islamic Terror Attacks Since 9/11

Mission Overview

Most Western societies are based on Secular Democracy, which itself is based on the concept that the open marketplace of ideas leads to the optimum government. Whilst that model has been very successful, it has defects. The 4 Freedoms address 4 of the principal vulnerabilities, and gives corrections to them. 

At the moment, one of the main actors exploiting these defects, is Islam, so this site pays particular attention to that threat.

Islam, operating at the micro and macro levels, is unstoppable by individuals, hence: "It takes a nation to protect the nation". There is not enough time to fight all its attacks, nor to read them nor even to record them. So the members of 4F try to curate a representative subset of these events.

We need to capture this information before it is removed.  The site already contains sufficient information to cover most issues, but our members add further updates when possible.

We hope that free nations will wake up to stop the threat, and force the separation of (Islamic) Church and State. This will also allow moderate Muslims to escape from their totalitarian political system.

The 4 Freedoms

These 4 freedoms are designed to close 4 vulnerabilities in Secular Democracy, by making them SP or Self-Protecting (see Hobbes's first law of nature). But Democracy also requires - in addition to the standard divisions of Executive, Legislature & Judiciary - a fourth body, Protector of the Open Society (POS), to monitor all its vulnerabilities (see also Popper). 
1. SP Freedom of Speech
Any speech is allowed - except that advocating the end of these freedoms
2. SP Freedom of Election
Any party is allowed - except one advocating the end of these freedoms
3. SP Freedom from Voter Importation
Immigration is allowed - except where that changes the political demography (this is electoral fraud)
4. SP Freedom from Debt
The Central Bank is allowed to create debt - except where that debt burden can pass across a generation (25 years).

An additional Freedom from Religion is deducible if the law is applied equally to everyone:

  • Religious and cultural activities are exempt from legal oversight except where they intrude into the public sphere (Res Publica)"

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